Tag Archives: Alexandria

Alexandria’s Confederate Monument Features Likeness of White Supremacist Attorney General

On the day the local newspaper, the Alexandria Gazette, reported on the dedication of the confederate monument [May 24, 1889], Appomattox, the following “note” appeared on page 3:

“It is said that Mr. Elder, when he painted “Appomattox” from which the statue erected today was designed, took the head of Mr. Raleigh T. Daniel for the model.”

In the presidential election of 1860 Raleigh Travers Daniel supported John Bell, a former Whig and candidate of the Constitutional Union Party. Although Daniel initially opposed secession, he warmly embraced the Confederate cause after the spring of 1861 and in November of that year was a presidential elector for Jefferson Davis. Lacking a record of distinction in the militia and being too old for military service, Daniel did not fight in the Civil War but served instead as commonwealth’s attorney of Richmond.

Daniel gained statewide prominence in the altered political environment after the war. In April 1867 he made a patronizing address before a Richmond meeting of African Americans who were soon to vote for the first time in which he suggested that they follow the advice of the state’s white political leaders.

As attorney general, Daniel refused to enforce laws designed to protect voting rights of recently enfranchised African-Americans.

Portions of this article are attributed, with thanks to Encyclopedia Virginia.

Negro Train-Wrecking?

Alexandria Gazette, Volume 102, Number 15, 17 January 1901

Barely a day passes in Alexandria without some racist article being printed in the Alexandria Gazette, to wit:

“Now that the negroes in the South have gone to train-wrecking, the perils of railroad travel in the sparsely settled regions of this section will be greatly increased.  Freedom and free schools and suffrage may be great things, but it has been demonstrated in this country that the farther removed the negroes are from the supervision of the white man, the worse they become and the worse it is for everybody else.

Alexandrians Killed and Wounded

Alexandria Gazette, Volume 63, Number 149, 12 June 1862

Alexandrians Killed and Wounded

The Seventeeth Virginia Regiment sustained severe losses in the battles near Richmond, on the 31st of May and 1st of June. We give below a list of such casualties as are published in Richmond papers of the 6th inst:

KILLED — Sergeant Major Francis.
Old Dominion Rifles – Wm. Lunt, shot in breast;  Monroe Whittington, shot in head; J.H. Higdon and John Murray.
Mt. Vernon Guards – James Molair.
Emmett Guards – Lt. Wm. Gray.

WOUNDED
Major Arthur Herbert, shot in the foot.
Old Dominion Rifles – Capt. W.H. Fowle, jr., arm amputated; Lieut. Thomas Fitzhugh, arm amputated; James Godwin, in foot; Jonah W. Baldwin, thigh fractured; Edwin Baldwin, in head slightly; Wm. J. Hall, in head slightly; Robert Young, in right arm slightly; F. August Calmus, slightly; E.W. Burgess; Hallie Appich, in head slightly.

Alexandria Rifles — Color Sergeant William T. Morrell, wounded in arm, side and foot — foot amputated; W.E.H. Clagett, in shoulder, seriously; Richard W. Avery, in top of head; A Carlisle Fairfax, in thigh.

Mt. Vernon Guards — R.H. Roland, seriously; Albert Hicks and ________ Gerecke.

Emmett Guards — Lieut. Adie; Patrick H. Suddoth, Company D.

Loudoun Guards — Chas. Fadley, in arm; C.H. Bradfield.

Other Companies — Thos. W. Lynn, Robert Steele, James M. Jenkins, D.M. Wallace, G.F. Jenkins, J.W. Cromwell.

Col. Wm. Smith, of the 49th Virginia,  was wounded slightly, and Lieut. Col. Gibson, of the same regiment, badly.

Most of the wounded Alexandrians are represented to be at Chew’s Factory Hospital, Richmond.  The Enquirer says; “The building is spacious and airy, and admirably kept. The patients are clean and comfortable, and have every want attended to.  A large number of ladies were yesterday in attendance, ministering to the stricken sufferers as only a woman can.”

Qualification of Voters – Virginia

Alexandria Gazette, Volume 66, Number 101, 4 May 1865

The following is the Third Article of the Constitution of the State of Virginia adopted by the Convention which assembled in Alexandria on the 13th of February, 1864, and which prescribes the qualifications of voters in the State:

Every white male citizen of the Commonwealth, of the age of twenty-one years, who has been a resident of the State for one year, and of the county, city or town where he offers to vote for six months next preceding an election, and has paid all taxes assessed to him, after the adoption of this constitution, under the laws of the Commonwealth after the reorganization of the county, city or town where he offers to vote, shall be qualified to vote for members of the general assembly, and all officers elective by the people.  Provided, however, that no one shall be allowed to vote who, when he offers to vote, shall not thereupon take, or shall not before have taken, the following oath: “I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support the Constitution of the United States and the laws made in pursuance thereof, as the supreme law of the land, anything in the Constitution and laws of the State of Virginia, or in the ordinances of the Convention which assembled at Richmond on the thirteenth day of February, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, to the contrary notwithstanding; and that I will uphold and defend the government of Virginia as restored by the Convention which assembled at Wheeling on the eleventh day of June, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, and that I have not since the first day of January, eighteen hundred and sixty-four, voluntarily given aid or assistance, in any way, to those in rebellion against the Government of the United States for the purpose of promoting the same. ” But the Legislature shall have power to pass an act or acts prescribing means which persons who have been disfranchised by this provision shall or may be restored to the rights of voters when in their opinion it will be safe to do so.  Any person falsely so swearing shall be subject to the penalties of perjury.

No person shall hold any office under this Constitution who shall not have taken and subscribed the oath aforesaid.  But no person shall vote or hold office under the constitution who has held office under the so called confederate government, or under any rebellious State government, or has been a member of the so called confederate congress, or a member of any State Legislature in rebellion against the authority of the United States, excepting therefrom county officers.

The Environment

Alexandria Gazette, Volume 89, Number 260, 3 November 1888
Saturday Evening, November 3

There are only two days between this and election day. If there be any white man in Virginia in whose mind a single doubt yet remains concerning the ballot he shall cast, let him reflect that to every Virginian who has any interest in the welfare of his State, the result of the election will be of the greatest importance. To every such man the tariff, the internal revenue, the Blair bill, and the refusal of Mr. Vilas to appoint ex-confederates to watchmen’s places, are insignificant when compared with the injury that would be inflicted upon every industrial interests in Virginia by the almost necessary effect of a republican victory. The republicans themselves avow their intention, in case of success, of reopening the Southern question, and that, of course, would at once revive all of the now almost settled sectional and race animosities in the South; and all men of common sense know that business could not prosper under such a condition of affairs. And besides, so ignorant are the vast majority of the negroes, that they would look upon a republican victory as a complete license for any impudence of which they might choose to be guilty; and it would be but a step from such impudence to actual outrage. The impudence would naturally be resented, and the outrage certainly be prevented, and the whole State be thrown into confusion and trouble, and a general depression in all kinds of industry be the inevitable result. The condition of the people of Virginia is bad enough as it is, in all conscience, but it would be infinitely worse if the South hating party should regain control of the government. Better bear the ills we have than fly to those worse ones, which we know of by bitter experience.

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An intelligent and thrifty foreign born resident of the city told the writer of this article yesterday that he had always, heretofore, been a republican, but that he had lived to see the error of his way, and had learned that so far as the Southern States are concerned, it is for the interest of every one of them, and of that of all their people, black as well as white, that every white man in them should vote the democratic ticket. The issue in the South, he said, is white or black supremacy, and when reduced to that, every white man should vote the same way, for blood is thicker than water. He had found, he said, by long experience, that if the negroes be given an inch they will demand an ell, and that the best way to get along with them was to keep them in their place. He had, he said, recently seen groups of young negro men on the outskirts of the city, either gaze insultingly at young white women, or else so obstruct the sidewalk as to make them take the roadway in order to pass. Some native born residents of the city would do well to follow the example set them by their foreign born fellow citizen referred to.