Tag Archives: Republicans

Hoyer Remarks During House Democrats Conference Call to Discuss ACA

WASHINGTON, DC – House Democratic Whip Steny H. Hoyer (MD) joined Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and House Democratic leaders on a conference call to discuss the Affordable Care Act this afternoon. Below is a transcript of his opening remarks and his responses during the question and answer portion of the call:

“Thank you very much, Leader. I appreciate your convening this call and including our leadership on there; the three committees are so relevant to what the Republicans are trying to do.
“Six years ago, January 2011, the Republicans took over the House and have tried to repeal, immediately, the Affordable Care Act ever since.

“Of course, if the ACA were to be repealed, not only as it was pointed out, would tens of millions of Americans lose their coverage – tens of millions of others would see their health care costs skyrocket. I know that Mr. [Richard] Neal, Mr. [Frank] Pallone, and Mr. [Bobby] Scott are going to speak to that.

“According to the Tax Policy Center, repealing the ACA would significantly raise taxes for around seven million Americans, who would lose their tax credits to purchase insurance through the marketplace—a devastating effect for them.

“And according to the Brookings Institution, repealing the Affordable Care Act would increase premiums by 20 percent or more. That’s a startling figure, and Republicans, I’m sure, won’t speak to that.

“Republicans’ so-called ‘repeal-and-delay’ plan is code for ‘repeal-without-an-alterative.’ Again, six years demanding immediate repeal and no alternative to replace it.

“The truth is, they don’t have one, and their plan is simply to turn back the clock. ‘Make American unhealthy again’ perhaps.

“I heard recently through social media from a woman whose family was able to save more than $1,200 a month, and that’s a month, in other words almost $15,000 a year, because of the availability of the health insurance marketplace.

“Another wrote to tell me that the ACA made it possible for her to sign up for coverage for the first time in years since she lost her job. Her name was Ann and her employer-based insurance lapsed when she lost her job, and when she needed to be hospitalized this spring for three days, having coverage, she says ‘saved her life.’

“Democrats will not sit idly by and watch the Affordable Care Act be dismantled and tens of millions lose their insurance and protections. And the challenge and risk it will put Medicaid and Medicare to as well. But importantly, it will increase the premiums of almost every American for the insurance they have now through their employers.

“We’re going to fight as hard as ever to protect the ACA and make sure hardworking Americans, and their families, are not forced to choose between paying for health care and paying for heat in their home, paying for food, and other absolutely essential items.

“Thank you, Leader, again, and I look forward to hearing from Mr. Neal, who is the new Ranking Member of the Ways and Means Committee.”
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“We believe that was a very essential piece of legislation that was passed to the benefit of all Americans, including those who have employer-based insurance. The fact is that we should have been working for the past years to make sure that it works as best as it possibly can because health care coverage is not an option for all Americans. So yes, it’s a priority for us from that perspective. There are many other priorities, which the Leader just mentioned and which we will pay attention to as well.”

“Let me make three quick points. We are defending a policy that over 2.8 million Americans supported the candidate who wanted this than supported the candidate who won. The candidate didn’t win. It doesn’t mean that Trump is not going to be president, but it does mean that more Americans voted for this policy than voted against it. Number two, there was an interesting story that was written, I think it was about a Kentucky community that voted, like 80 percent for Trump. And they interviewed a number of people, and one woman in particular said, ‘Oh I don’t expect anybody to repeal the Affordable Care Act. I’m on that Act and it’s absolutely essential for me and my family.’ So I think that in our defense, a lot of people are going to be looking at this and saying, ‘Gee I didn’t really think they meant that,’ any more than they want to see Social Security privatized or voucherized. They may have voted for Trump, but if they try to do either one of those things, they are going to say to themselves, ‘That’s not what I meant.’ That’s exactly what happened in 1995, as [Newt] Gingrich and company shut down the government. The American people said, ‘that’s not what I meant.’ And after that, we picked up seats, as you recall. So we are defending a policy that we believe the majority of the American public believes is an important benefit for them and their families, to make America stronger and their families stronger.”

“Let me add that this a very cynical political approach, ‘repeal-and-delay.’ It’s essentially an admission that what they’ve been trying to do for the last six years will be very detrimental and will not only have extraordinarily adverse health effects on the American people, but also a very adverse political effect when the American people see the result of repeal. So what they are cynically saying is even after the [20]18 election, or after the 2020 election we will have it go into effect, so they do not have to bear the political responsibility of the consequences of their act. And I think it is a very politically cynical strategy on their part, and an absolute admission that they no alternative.”

The Environment

Alexandria Gazette, Volume 89, Number 260, 3 November 1888
Saturday Evening, November 3

There are only two days between this and election day. If there be any white man in Virginia in whose mind a single doubt yet remains concerning the ballot he shall cast, let him reflect that to every Virginian who has any interest in the welfare of his State, the result of the election will be of the greatest importance. To every such man the tariff, the internal revenue, the Blair bill, and the refusal of Mr. Vilas to appoint ex-confederates to watchmen’s places, are insignificant when compared with the injury that would be inflicted upon every industrial interests in Virginia by the almost necessary effect of a republican victory. The republicans themselves avow their intention, in case of success, of reopening the Southern question, and that, of course, would at once revive all of the now almost settled sectional and race animosities in the South; and all men of common sense know that business could not prosper under such a condition of affairs. And besides, so ignorant are the vast majority of the negroes, that they would look upon a republican victory as a complete license for any impudence of which they might choose to be guilty; and it would be but a step from such impudence to actual outrage. The impudence would naturally be resented, and the outrage certainly be prevented, and the whole State be thrown into confusion and trouble, and a general depression in all kinds of industry be the inevitable result. The condition of the people of Virginia is bad enough as it is, in all conscience, but it would be infinitely worse if the South hating party should regain control of the government. Better bear the ills we have than fly to those worse ones, which we know of by bitter experience.

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An intelligent and thrifty foreign born resident of the city told the writer of this article yesterday that he had always, heretofore, been a republican, but that he had lived to see the error of his way, and had learned that so far as the Southern States are concerned, it is for the interest of every one of them, and of that of all their people, black as well as white, that every white man in them should vote the democratic ticket. The issue in the South, he said, is white or black supremacy, and when reduced to that, every white man should vote the same way, for blood is thicker than water. He had found, he said, by long experience, that if the negroes be given an inch they will demand an ell, and that the best way to get along with them was to keep them in their place. He had, he said, recently seen groups of young negro men on the outskirts of the city, either gaze insultingly at young white women, or else so obstruct the sidewalk as to make them take the roadway in order to pass. Some native born residents of the city would do well to follow the example set them by their foreign born fellow citizen referred to.